Andrew Maynard on AI, Responsible Innovation & The Future of Humanity

by | Friday, December 15, 2023

Welcome once again to our ongoing column series where we delve into the intersection of technology, creativity, and education. Our conversations with authorities such as Chris Dede (Harvard), Ethan Mollick (Wharton), and Kyle Jensen (ASU) have centered around the transformative role of AI in redefining both creativity and educational practices.

Our latest conversation was with my friend Andrew Maynard, a leading thinker on emerging technologies and humanity’s future. Our wide-ranging conversation covered topics from the promise of AI and machine-human collaboration to the critical importance of empowering diverse voices to shape the technological advances on the horizon. Andrew, as usual, had thought-provoking insights on fostering creativity and innovation as well as the urgent need for responsible innovation. A complete citation and link to the article is given below. I know you will all appreciate Andrew’s balanced perspective and optimism about our collective ability to wield new technologies in ways that enrich society, though he does not shy away from discussing the gravity of the decisions we face in charting the future course of AI.

Richardson, C., Oster, N., Henriksen, D., & Mishra, P. (2023). Artificial Intelligence, Responsible Innovation, and the Future of Humanity with Andrew Maynard. TechTrends https://doi.org/10.1007/s11528-023-00921-2

Note: The background image above was created using Dall-E, final design by Punya Mishra.

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