Punya Mishra is Associate Dean of Scholarship & Innovation and Professor in the Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University (with an affiliate appointment in the Design School). As associate dean, he leads a range of initiatives that provides a future-forward, equity driven, approach to inter/trans-disciplinary educational research. He is internationally recognized for his work in educational technology; the role of creativity and aesthetics in learning; and the application of collaborative, design-based approaches to educational innovation. He has received over $11 million in grants; published over 200 articles and edited 5 books. With over 58,000 citations of his research, he is ranked among the top 2% of scientists worldwide and the top 50 scholars (top 10 in psychology) who have the biggest influence on educational practice and policy in the United States. An AERA Fellow (2024), TED-Ed educator (2023), he co-hosts the award-winning Silver Lining for Learning webinar as well as the Value Laden and Learning Futures podcasts. He is also an award-winning instructor, an engaging public speaker, and an accomplished visual artist and poet. More here…

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Popular Topics: Gen AI <Posts & Pubs> | 5 Spaces for Design <Posts & Pubs>| TPACK | Design |Creativity | Ambigrams

Blog Posts

JTE Call for Proposals: Gen AI in Teacher Preparation

JTE Call for Proposals: Gen AI in Teacher Preparation

The Journal of Teacher Education (JTE), is the flagship journal of American Association of Colleges of Teacher education (AACTE). It has been a leading voice in the field of teacher preparation for 75 years and is one of the most widely read professional journals in...

From Surveillance to Support: Building Student Trust in the Era of AI

From Surveillance to Support: Building Student Trust in the Era of AI

Note: This post originates from collaboration and discussions between Melissa, Punya, and Nicole. However, it is written from Nicole’s point of view as a current student, reflecting our efforts to explore student perspectives when considering the integration of AI in...

Racist or just biased? It’s complicated 

Racist or just biased? It’s complicated 

Note: This is a continuation of the shared blogging of Warr, Mishra, and Oster. In this post, Melissa wrote the first draft to which Punya and Nicole added substantial revisions and edits. “Science” is social. We build on each other’s ideas. We critique each other’s...

GenAI is Racist. Period. 

GenAI is Racist. Period. 

Note: The shared blogging with Melissa Warr and Nicole Oster continues. I crafted the student essay, Melissa generated the data using her magical GPT skills. I wrote the first draft which was then edited by Melissa and Nicole.    Imagine you are a...

ChatGPT does not have a user manual. Let’s not create one.

ChatGPT does not have a user manual. Let’s not create one.

Note: This is the next post in the shared blogging experiment with Melissa Warr and Nicole Oster. This time we question what and how we should be teaching about generative AI. The core idea and first draft came from Melissa, to which Nicole and I added revisions and...

GenAI in Education: MFLTC’s systems approach

GenAI in Education: MFLTC’s systems approach

Over two years ago we started a Learning Futures Collaborative focusing on the role of Artificial Intelligence in Education (The AI in Ed LFC). I like to emphasize the fact that we started the LFC BEFORE ChatGPT was released into the world. We were ahead of the curve....

… or check out some random blog posts

Aesthetics & STEM education: A new framework

Aesthetics & STEM education: A new framework

I have always been intrigued by the nature and role of the aesthetic experience in learning. A few members of the Deep-Play research group have been exploring this issue for a while (for instance we have written on, why science teachers should care about beauty in...

Teachers ARE designers (in many different ways)

Teachers ARE designers (in many different ways)

One of the pleasures of academia is working with awesome graduate students. This paper is an example of such a collaboration. Melissa Warr, for some reason or the other, decided to do a network analysis of some of the top-cited papers related to teaching and design....

Thank you, Chile!

Rotate I spent the past seven days in Chile, six days in Santiago and one in Valpariso. It was absolutely wonderful. My trip was sponsored by the Faculty of Education at the Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile (PUC is one of the nation's premier universities), as...

New edited series on Research to Practice

A few months ago I was invited (by the Educational Technology & Management Academy, an Indian educational organization) to write a series of short practitioner-oriented articles for a new educational e-magazine they were starting. The idea was to introduce to a...

Blast from the past: Theories and memory

Ambigram for the word "Theory" by Punya Mishra My first real research study was one that I conducted back when I was a graduate student under the mentorship of Bill Brewer. It was designed as a classic educational psychology memory study and though I have done little...

Visualizing periodic tables (What not to do)

Sean Nash (of Nashworld) sent me a link to A Periodic Table of Visualization Methods of Management. This is a very cool looking representation developed by Ralph Lengler & Martin Eppler at the Institute of Corporate Communication at the University of Lugano,...

3 pieces of wisdom, one muddled conclusion

Just came up with this in response to something Leigh had said on Facebook... thought it ought to be saved for the future: Great fools think that birds of a feather seldom differ together! I wonder what it means? Can you identify the three nuggets of wisdom that went...

WordMapping the debate

I created two WordMaps (using wordle.net) using all the words used by Obama and McCain during their third and final debate. Kind of interesting. Check them out (Click on the image for larger versions, hosted on Flickr). Wordle created using all the words used by...