Me & We in AI

by | Tuesday, December 19, 2023

What does generative AI mean to me? And to us? These key questions were part of a special exhibit curated by students in the DCI 691: Education by Design course I taught this fall.

Education by Design is my favorite class to teach. It is a course about design—design as way of thinking and as a process that values collaboration, context, and diverse perspectives. Design as an approach that generates creative solutions to complex (wicked) problems of practice, particularly in education. At a fundamental level the course is about help each of the students develop their own “design-colored lenses” and see the world around us and we try and get there through a variety of activities, readings, discussions, and assignments.

None of these, discussions and readings, really get students to experience of what it means to really design something. Design I truly believe has to be lived and experienced as authentically as possible, so that we can compare the abstractions of research papers with the complex reality of truly engaging in collaborative design. 

The class stepped up to the challenge, and worked together over the semester to create an event called Me | We in AI that allowed participants to explore and engage with a broad array of Generative AI tools—text, audio, music, video and more. More important were the questions and discussions about creativity, ownership, identity and agency that sometimes spontaneously emerged or were curated by the students. Almost a 100 people went through the exhibit, exploring, playing and discussing the implications of AI on our lives on on us (both individually and collectively). Some of that activity and engagement is captured below.

The students who made it happen (in alphabetical order of last name) are: Kevin Brown, Jami Carmichael, Theresa Hoover, Rezwana Islam, Kellie Kreiser, J’Shon Lee, Rachna Mathur, Lin Yan.

Special thanks to: Nicole Oster, Sean Leahy, Joshua Thompson, Allison Hall and the ET Team for all their help.

Below. is a story that appeared on the tech.asu.edu website as well as some videos and photographs from the event.

A video I created for the event

Below is a slideshow of photographs from the event.

A few randomly selected blog posts…

The School Design Game v 1.0

The School Design Game v 1.0

The journey  of design is complicated, filled with conundrums —some expected, others not so much. There are many possible strategies  to address them as we iterate our way to the finish line. The School Design Game seeks to explore some of these complexities...

Reimagining conteXt in TPACK: New article

Reimagining conteXt in TPACK: New article

Back in September I wrote a long-ish blog post about something that had bothered me for years and years about the canonical TPACK diagram. It had to do with how contextual knowledge was represented in the diagram, or rather how it was not represented in the diagram....

A Systems view of creativity

A Systems view of creativity

Our series of articles related to the broad topic of Rethinking technology and creativity for the 21st century in the journal TechTrends continues with two new articles. The first focuses on developing a systems view of creativity,...

The futures of higher ed with Phoebe Wagner

The futures of higher ed with Phoebe Wagner

The Center for Science and the Imagination at ASU runs a series of short stories and virtual gatherings that explore issues related to transformative change. Essentially they solicit and publish a (super-short) short story that explores “themes of community,...

Quick Design Video: Are you ready for the future?

Leigh Wolf and Ken Dirkin, instructors in the year III of the MAET program in Plymouth have been assigning, what they call, Quick Design assignments. These are quickfire challenges for students to showcase their talents under pretty severe constraints (of time,...

Science teachers and social justice

Science teachers and social justice

I have been editing a series of articles for iWonder: Rediscovering School Science, a practitioner orientated journal for middle school science teachers, published by the Azim Premji University. Our first article was titled "Why teachers should care of...

Kenya sings India for Pangea Day

NYTimes technology columnist, David Pogue, has a recent blog entry about Pangea Day, a global film festival coming up in a few days. As he says in his note: Pangea Day endeavors to bring the world together and promote understanding and tolerance through film. Over...

Psychology & torture: A sad mix

Martin Seligman is one of the most eminent psychologists alive today. As his wikipedia page says, "He is well known for his work on the idea of "learned helplessness", and more recently, for his contributions to leadership in the field of Positive Psychology." He has...

Origin-al Interface snafu!

Origin-al Interface snafu!

The Origins Project at ASU is an attempt to explore humankind's most fundamental questions about our origins. As the website says, This project brings "together a diverse collection of the world’s leading scientists, scholars, and public intellectuals...

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *