Neuroscience, downtime and creativity: New article

by | Saturday, October 01, 2016

In this article, in our ongoing series on Rethinking technology & creativity in the 21st centurywe interview Dr. Jung. Dr. Jung is a neuro-psychologist, brain imaging researcher, and a clinical professor of neurosurgery at the University of New Mexico. He started his graduate career interested in issues of intelligence… With time, however, Dr. Jung increasingly came to realize that intelligence was not enough to explain the vast array of human capabilities—particularly to issues such as creativity and innovation. For this reason, he has devoted the second decade of his career to better understanding creative cognition from a neuroscientific perspective. He speaks to three key ideas that (a) creativity can be cultivated; (b) it is (in)disciplined in nature – in that it requires both deep knowledge of a field as well as a willingness to step of the the discipline; and finally that (c) creativity needs downtime. Read the complete article below:

Mehta, R., Mishra, P., & the Deep-Play Research Group (2016). Downtime as a key to novelty generation: Understanding the neuroscience of creativity with Dr. Rex JungTech Trends (60)6.

A few randomly selected blog posts…

Of Math and Ambigrams

Mathematicians love puzzles—they love to play with numbers and shapes but often their love can turn to words and other areas that, at least on the surface, have little to do with mathematics. One form of visual wordplay with some deep connections to mathematics, and...

Harold Pinter, RIP

One way of looking at speech is to say it is a constant stratagem to cover nakedness — Harold Pinter (1930 - 2008).

Teacher as filmmaker: An update from down under

Back in 2007, I was second author on a paper titled Teacher as Filmmaker, in which we described an approach to teacher professional development that involved teachers creating short, evocative movies, which we called iVideos. You can read the paper and abstract...

When tech comes first: The Khan Academy as leading pedagogical change

As I go around the country talking about the TPACK framework, one of the questions that is always put to me is, about which comes first when planning a lesson, content, pedagogy or technology. The standard answer is that content comes first since it is only after we...

Wordplay

Wordplay

Just some visual wordplay that I have indulged in, just for the heck of it. Nothing really special, though I am partial to the "Explore, Create, Share" design. That was the motto of the MAET program at MSU that I directed for years.  Innovate 2 on Creativity...

Guest blogging for Nashworld: TPACK video

Sean Nash over at Nashworld asked me to guest blog for this week while he is out with his students doing some really cool stuff. Here is a link to my posting: A TPACK video mashup!. I end the post with a couple of videos, one a commercial and the other my mashup...

Mobile Technology in Teacher Education

I was recently invited to keynote The First International Conference on Mobile Technology in Teacher Education (MiTE 2015). The conference was organized by the School of Education, National University of Ireland, Galway. Kudos to the organizers (main point of contact...

Talk at Fulton School of Engineering

Talk at Fulton School of Engineering

Last August I was invited to speak at an event organized by the Ira Fulton School of Engineering's Learning and Teaching Hub. For some reason I had not posted about it — so better late than never... here it is, a 30 min talk followed by QnA....

Visualizing feeds

Sean Nash of Nashworld (recognizing a fellow data visualization junkie in me) had sent me this link a while ago ... but I just got around to it today. Check out FeedVis. So what does FeedVis do - think of it as a tag-cloud generator on steroids. Lots of fun there -...

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