Article in WEF Global Information Technology Report

by | Wednesday, April 22, 2015

WEF-meme

Everybody has heard of the  World Economic Forum (WEF) annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland. As Wikipedia says, “The meeting brings together some 2,500 top business leaders, international political leaders, selected intellectuals, and journalists to discuss the most pressing issues facing the world, including health and the environment.” The WEF is more than the Davos meeting, however. It is an “independent international organization committed to improving the state of the world by engaging business, political, academic, and other leaders of society to shape global, regional, and industry agendas.” Website at http://www.weforum.org/

The WEF recently came out with the Global Information Technology Report 2015. The theme this year was ICT for Inclusive Growth. I was invited to write a chapter in the report by Anurag Behar, vice-chancellor of the Azim Premji University and co-CEO of the Azim Premji Foundation. You can access the complete report by clicking the link above or read the PDF of our chapter by clicking on the title below.

Behar, A., & Mishra, P. (2015). ICTs in Schools: Why focusing policy and resources on educators, not children, will improve educational outcomes. In ICT for Inclusive Growth: Global Information Technology Report 2015. World Economic Forum.

Sadly this doesn’t mean that I am headed to Davos anytime soon… but it is good to have our ideas out there, hopefully to be read by “business, political, academic, and other leaders of society” and through that, hopefully help “shape global, regional, and industry agendas.”

A few randomly selected blog posts…

Looking for IT in India

A few days ago Jack Schwille, assistant dean for international studies in education, sent an email out to all faculty and students at the college of education announcing a talk by me titled: "Help Punya find IT in India?" This presentation was to be fifth in the...

ZIPskinny

Just found out about this website www.zipskinny.com, a great example of how the web makes information easily available. This website allows you to enter your US zip code, and see US Census data and comparisons with neighboring ZIP codes (or other ZIP codes, upto to 20...

Jere Brophy / Motivation Ambigram

A new ambigram created in memory of Jere Brophy, world renowned scholar on psychology of motivation. The ambigram reads, "motivation" one direction and "Jere Brophy" when rotated by 180 degrees. Click on the image to see a larger version, hosted on Flickr....

Silver Lining for Learning as a driver of Innovation

Silver Lining for Learning as a driver of Innovation

We recently celebrated 100 episodes of Silver Lining for Learning (see the 100th episode or read my blog post about the journey). In this process we have had an opportunity to speak with some amazing people – educational leaders, innovators, administrators, deans,...

The civilizing effects of technology

Martin Amis was recently interviewed in Guernica (Amis Unfiltered, Santiago Wills interviews Martin Amis). The interview covered a wide range of topics, literature, Obama, and a fascinating digression on the relationship between food and national character!  What...

On writing less badly

I just came across an article in the Chronicle of Higher Education titled, 10 tips on How to Write Less Badly [H/T Geekpress]. It is not that I agreed with every point being made there but a couple of them (To become a writer, write!; Find a voice, don't just get...

You have a life?

Story in the NYTimes (forwarded to me by Leigh) titled: Professor as an open book, about how "professors of all ranks and disciplines are revealing such information on public, national platforms: blogs, Web pages, social networking sites, even campus television." Of...

Profesor 2.0, blurring the boundaries

I am in Chicago to give the Keynote address at the 2009 DePaul University Faculty Teaching and Learning Conference. The conference theme this year is Engaging Minds: Pedagogy and Personalism. I was invited by Sharon Guan (she was part of the AACTE Innovation &...

Total eclipse of the sun: An experiment with visual AI

Total eclipse of the sun: An experiment with visual AI

In a previous post I explored some of the visual capabilities of ChatGPT. This is a continuation of those experiments, where ChatGPT helped me identify the date and time of a solar eclipse based on a photo I took decades ago, as a graduate student at the University of...

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