The role of Vitamin D in beta-cell function

by | Tuesday, December 02, 2008

Who says scientists can’t have fun. I just discovered a series of videos on (where else) YouTube about scientists expressing their doctoral research through dance!!! What can be cooler than that? Check out one of the winners: The role of Vitamin D in beta-cell function

[Youtube:http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=QiTFBRPFRh8]

A bit of internet sleuthing revealed that this was the result of a competition organized by Science Magazine.

Six weeks ago, the Gonzo Scientist challenged researchers around the world to interpret their Ph.D. research in dance form, film the dance, and share it with the world on YouTube (Science, 10 October, p. 186). By the 11 p.m. deadline this past Sunday, 36 dances–including solo ballet and circus spectacle–had been submitted online. A panel of nine judges–the three winners of the first “Dance Your Ph.D.” contest, three scientists from Harvard University, and three artistic directors of the dance company Pilobolus–scored the dances on their ability to bridge the art and science worlds. Today, Science announces the winners of the 2009 AAAS Science Dance Contest in four categories: Graduate Students, Postdocs, Professors, and Popular Choice

Read the complete story here and watch the other winning videos as well.

Topics related to this post: Art | Biology | Creativity | Fun | Learning | Representation | Research | Science | Worth Reading

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1 Comment

  1. Claire Parker

    Yeah. Scientist CAN have fun!!! Thank you for making us laugh with the video and the quote.

    Reply

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