Why blog

by | Thursday, October 16, 2008

Andrew Sullivan is one of my favorite bloggers, not because I agree with all that he says there is a certain sensibility that emerges as you follow his blog for a while that appeals to me. He has a great piece in The Atlantic Monthly titled Why I blog?. Speaking of ship’s logs (and comparing them to web-logs or blogs) he says:

As you read a log, you have the curious sense of moving backward in time as you move forward in pages—the opposite of a book. As you piece together a narrative that was never intended as one, it seems—and is—more truthful. Logs, in this sense, were a form of human self-correction. They amended for hindsight, for the ways in which human beings order and tidy and construct the story of their lives as they look back on them. Logs require a letting-go of narrative because they do not allow for a knowledge of the ending. So they have plot as well as dramatic irony—the reader will know the ending before the writer did.

Read the entire essay…

Topics related to this post: Art | Blogging | Books | Stories | Technology | Writing

A few randomly selected blog posts…

Visualizing mathematics

I love visual proofs of mathematical theorems. One visual proof I use quite often in my design courses (CEP817 or CEP917) is a visual proof of the fact that the sum of consecutive odd numbers is a square number. In other words: 1 + 3 = 4 = 22 1 + 3 + 5 = 9 = 32 1 + 3...

The distance education revolution

TCRecord this week features an article by Gary Natriello titled Modest Changes, Revolutionary Possibilities: Distance Learning and the Future of Education. As the abstract says In this essay, I take stock of the developments shaping distance learning and consider the...

SITE 2008, Trust and Digital Technologies

At SITE 2008 Andrea Francis and I presented a paper titled Why some teachers trust digital technologies and other don't? Abstract: Digital technologies have the potential to provide educators with new ways of instructing and learning. However, some educators still...

Microblogging in the classroom

I have written quite a bit about how a technology can become an educational technology (see this, this, this and this). This is a non-trivial task that all educators face, and requires situational creativity in re-purposing / re-designing the existing tool to meet...

Wicked problems, Design & Horst Rittel

Matt Koehler and I have often talked about the wicked problems of design and teaching with technology (most specifically in our handbook chapter on TPACK). We take the idea of wicked problems from a classic paper written by Rittel and Weber back in 1973. As Wikipedia...

Us in Flux: A conversation with Sarah Pinsker

Us in Flux: A conversation with Sarah Pinsker

The Center for Science and the Imagination at ASU has a new series called Us in Flux. Every two weeks they publish a (super-short) short story that explores "themes of community, collaboration, and collective imagination in response to transformative events." They...

TPACK: A podcast

I just discovered a podcast about TPACK. The folks over at GenTech created a podcast back in September 2007. Check it out here or alternatively here. As they describe it, "In this episode of GenTech, the boys discuss the framework itself and how it may be used as a...

Science teachers and social justice

Science teachers and social justice

I have been editing a series of articles for iWonder: Rediscovering School Science, a practitioner orientated journal for middle school science teachers, published by the Azim Premji University. Our first article was titled "Why teachers should care of...

Generative AI is WEIRD!

Generative AI is WEIRD!

Note: This blog post was almost entirely written by ChagGPT based on an analysis of a set of images I had uploaded onto it. The image above (Weird AI) is an original typographic design created by me. The background sky was created by Adobe Firefly. To give some...

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *