The perception of taste

by | Tuesday, January 15, 2008

A new study (with brain scanning no less) indicates that the more expensive the wine the better it tastes. As the MindHacks article (Higher price makes cheap wine taste better) reports, participants rated the more expensive wine as being more likeable even it was indentical to the, so called, cheaper wine. Here is the most important quote:

Interestingly, there was no difference in the brain areas directly related to experiencing taste, and the researchers suggest that the belief that the wine is more expensive probably doesn’t directly change our sensory experience, but leads us to think that the experience is more ‘valuable’.

So the price does not make a difference to how we process taste but it does change how we perceive it! Amazing.

Here is a link to the original research article [pdf] and another blog posting, this time from ScienceBlogs titled the Subjectivity of Wine.

Topics related to this post: Biology | Fun | Psychology

A few randomly selected blog posts…

Fractals, ambigrams & more

Fractals, ambigrams & more

Photo & and design © Punya Mishra.The photo of bubbles was taken with cell phone camera (equipped with a macro lens).  Fractals are mathematical/geometrical structures that exhibit self-similarity at increasingly small (or large) scales. Fractals were...

With Gratitude

With Gratitude

This past Monday was a special. That evening I was at Manitas School in Kyrene school district for the ribbon-cutting of the new school model we have been working on for the past two years. An important part of the evening was the reveal of the name of the new school...

New media, new genres

There is an interesting article in today's NYTimes titled Content and its discontents by Virginia Heffernan. In this article she makes the argument the new digital, online media require new ways of representing information, new ways of thinking about how ideas are...

Happy 2020 (& and new video)

Happy 2020 (& and new video)

We have been creating short videos to welcome the new year since 2008. This year was no exception. These videos, created on a shoe-string budget, are usually typographical in nature with some kind of an optical illusion or AHA! moment built in. Check out our latest...

Unpacking TPACK

Suzy Cox is a lecturer in educational technology and educational psychology at Utah Valley State College and also a doctoral candidate at Brigham Young University (working with Dr. Charles Graham). She is currently working on her dissertation which seeks to develop a...

Math & Visual Wordplay: New video

Math & Visual Wordplay: New video

The word "math" written such that it has rotational symmetryi.e. it reads the same even when rotated by 180-degrees. The relationship between mathematics and visual wordplay is one I have played with and writing about for a while (More here). I just discovered...

Guide on the side, the GPS story

People have often argued that digital technologies change the role of teachers from (as it is commonly described) a "sage on the stage" to a "guide on the side." Personally, I have my doubts about this, complicated somewhat by my recent experiences with GPS...

Failure has to be an option

I just read this great interview with Diane Ravitch on Slate.com (The wrong stuff). Diane Ravitch started out under George H.W. Bush as a strong supporter for NCLB (and all that goes with it, educational testing, school choice, charter schools etc. etc. etc.)....

ChatGPT does not have a user manual. Let’s not create one.

ChatGPT does not have a user manual. Let’s not create one.

Note: This is the next post in the shared blogging experiment with Melissa Warr and Nicole Oster. This time we question what and how we should be teaching about generative AI. The core idea and first draft came from Melissa, to which Nicole and I added revisions and...

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *